Write a Great Press Release

Getting the word out in a way that works!

Something exciting is happening at your company – a grand opening, a new location, the introduction of a new product – and you want to tell the world about it. But you’re a small company with a limited budget. You don’t have the luxury of a PR department, so you sit down to compose the press release yourself.

One thing’s for sure: your target audience will be busy. They may glance at the headline; they may even read the first paragraph. If the press release is especially compelling and they’re in the market for your particular products or services, they may continue to read. But don’t count on it.

How do you write a press release that grabs and keeps a reader’s attention? Here are four tips:

  1. Use a strong headline. Limit your headline to twenty words or less and put the most important information up front. Scan well-written publications like The New York Times or Wall Street Journal and you’ll find headlines with active words that boldly proclaim the gist of the story: “Record Rains Cause Major Flooding” or “Police Chief Gets New Term.” Follow their example. Keep it short.
  2. Keep it brief. Try to keep your press release to one page, two at the most. Anything longer runs the risk of reader fatigue. Busy reporters, editors, and readers aren’t interested in a dissertation. As Detective Joe Friday used to say, “Just the facts, ma’am.” The first paragraph should follow the journalist’s guideline of answering five basic questions: who, what, when, where, and why.
  3. Keep it focused. If you want to discuss both a new product and a new location, consider sending two press releases. Don’t dilute your message. The article should be centered on a single newsworthy topic. Include key words and phrases, and repeat them throughout the article. Assume that your press release will be published over the Internet, so make it easy for search engines – and your readers – to find and share your story. To add interest, consider including brief and relevant quotations from industry leaders, company executives, employees, and customers.
  4. Proof. Proof. Proof. Pay attention to detail. Check for grammatical errors. Give the article to others who can review it for typos and misspellings. There are plenty of free online tools that will grade your writing. Use them. Follow standard formatting – no fancy fonts or pretty colors. Does the press release read like a story with a beginning, middle and end? If not, break up content into easy-to-digest sections. And make sure your company’s contact information is clearly displayed.

Remember, a great press release focuses on telling the reader something interesting. Often less is more.

As always, should you have any questions or concerns regarding your tax situation please feel free to contact us.

 

woman writing

 

As always, we hope you find our tips and news for businesses valuable, and look forward to receiving your feedback. Companies focused on growth have sought the help of Insero & Co. for more than 40 years. During that time they have consistently experienced the peace of mind that comes from knowing their CPA firm takes the concept of integrity seriously. Should you have any questions, please contact us directly.

Cyber Security Starts with Your Employees

Action items to help protect your business

When identity thieves trick employees, businesses pay a steep price. Consider the case of the Oregon Department of Human Resources. In January 2019, the personal information of over 645,000 applicants was exposed to hackers. Why? Nine employees were conned into clicking on phishing emails.

The results can be catastrophic. Workers spend months cleaning up the mess. Companies face penalties, fines, and lawsuits. Customers and business partners lose confidence in your company’s ability to manage data. A company’s brand and reputation take a hit, creating a perfect storm for competitors to take full advantage of your problem.

Don’t become a statistic. Train your employees to be vigilant about the following identity theft schemes.

Phishing Emails

Here’s the scenario. An employee receives an email or text message purporting to come from company management or a trusted vendor. He or she is duped into opening the message and clicking on a malicious link. When the victim lands on a bogus page requesting both new and existing passwords, the attacker hijacks the original password to gain access to the network.

Action items. Beat this problem by training employees to recognize phishing schemes. Look for subtle mistakes such as spelling errors and domain name anomalies. Teach employees to hover their mouse over links to ensure they are legitimate. Above all, staff should routinely ask, “Why am I receiving this email?” A simple verification may be all that’s needed to stop a phishing attempt.

Ransomware

Ransomware is malicious software that infects a computer, locks it and then demands a ransom. In effect, the system’s critical data is held hostage until fees are paid. Like phishing, ransomware relies on victims to download pernicious software.

Action items. Train employees to confirm that senders are, in fact, trusted contacts. Teach them to avoid clicking on links from questionable sources. They should be particularly skeptical if an attachment asks them to enable macros, which is a common way ransomware is spread. Your best defense to ransomware is active, secure backups of all systems.

Social Media

Cyber-crooks use social media to gather enough information to appear legitimate to company employees. After all, if a worker receives an email from a well-known vendor who asks about his recent trip to Florida, the message must be legitimate. Right? Not necessarily.

Action items. Train employees to protect both themselves (and your business) when sharing on social media. Create a policy that limits the sharing of sensitive information on social media.

Internet Access

With the increase of telecommuting, data security risks continue to grow. Workers who access company networks from coffee shops, airports, or other unsecured access points may allow identity thieves to exploit vulnerabilities. In addition, with the expense of cellphone data, employees will be tempted to use your company wi-fi for personal use.

Action items. Limit personal access to your company wi-fi. Explore creating separate access for employee use during the day. Develop VPN protocols for remote workers, this limits access to your network. Require strong password, encryption, time-out locking and theft protocols within written policies. Prohibit access to your network using public wi-fi. Hire or create an accountable person to constantly monitor company security.

Company security is now a complex but critical success factor for all small businesses. Take it seriously by hiring experts and constantly training your employees to be vigilant.

 

security

 

As always, we hope you find our tips and news for businesses valuable, and look forward to receiving your feedback. Companies focused on growth have sought the help of Insero & Co. for more than 40 years. During that time they have consistently experienced the peace of mind that comes from knowing their CPA firm takes the concept of integrity seriously. Should you have any questions, please contact us directly.

Increase Cash Flow in Partnership with Suppliers

Suppliers can be a better source of cash than a bank!

Employee salaries, utility bills, taxes, payments to suppliers—these and myriad other transactions cause cash to flow out of your company. If your company isn’t keeping pace with these bills as they come due, you’re headed for trouble. Too often, suppliers help manage your cash only when you cannot pay them. Why not use them to help manage it? Here are some ideas to help slow down cash outflow with your suppliers.

  • Treat them as partners. It’s crucial to maintain positive relationships with companies that supply your raw materials, provide ancillary services, and otherwise keep revenues flowing. First identify your key suppliers. Then meet with them periodically to know how they are doing and create a relationship based on trust. If you are forecasting tight cash periods, let them know. If you need to pay late, proactively call them BEFORE the bill is due and let them know when you will be sending payment. Whatever you do, deliver on your promise.
  • Extend terms. Some invoices are due on receipt; others, a few days later. Negotiate the longest payback terms possible and ask for early-payment discounts. A two percent discount might not seem significant, but on bulk orders savings can accumulate. Depending on your industry, you might set up a vendor payment schedule that better reflects your accounts receivable history. For example, if you print catalogs, get a price quote with 120 day terms from your printer. The extended terms allow you to mail the catalog and receive orders to help pay the bill. The supplier can quote their price with the cost of the extended term built into their bill.
  • Simplify. Set up automatic payments from your company bank account. You won’t have to remember when a bill is due and the money will stay in your account as long as possible. Electronic fund transfers doesn’t eliminate the need to monitor cash flow or scrutinize payment terms, but they can reduce some of the headaches associated with paying bills on time. You might also consider moving from invoice payments to monthly statements. This allows you to reduce the processing work and make one payment per month.
  • Prioritize. Develop a priority payment list. Although everyone needs to be paid eventually, some vendors are more crucial to your success. They’re the ones you rely on to keep shelves stocked and customers coming back. Pay them first.
  • Release management. The principal here is to pay for inventory when you have a sale and not before. This helps match the cash outflow of the supplier payment with selling the product. One way to do this is to implement just in time (JIT) delivery, where you place the order with the supplier and they then deliver or ship it. Another way to do this is to provide a blanket purchase order to lock in lower pricing, but take delivery of the product over time. Then you pay for inventory when it is delivered versus when it is produced.

If managed correctly, your key suppliers can be an essential key to your business’ success.

 

Shaking hands

 

As always, we hope you find our tips and news for businesses valuable, and look forward to receiving your feedback. Companies focused on growth have sought the help of Insero & Co. for more than 40 years. During that time they have consistently experienced the peace of mind that comes from knowing their CPA firm takes the concept of integrity seriously. Should you have any questions, please contact us directly.

3 Factors in Finding the Best Employees

3 Factors in Finding the Best Employees

Turnover — an often overlooked cost of doing business — can be as high as 33% of an employee’s annual salary, according to a recent Work Institute report. One way to reduce this cost is to focus on preventing turnover right from the start by finding the candidates best suited for your business. If you haven’t already, consider the following key factors as you hone your hiring process:

  1. Know what qualities to look for in an employee. Before you publish a job announcement or talk to potential candidates, consider the type of employee that would fit best with your company. This may involve clarifying the types of qualities that fit your firm’s culture, as well as skills that are specific to the position being filled.
    For example, if the business prides itself on quick turnarounds, candidates who have proven they’ve consistently hit short deadlines are ideal. The same goes with interpersonal skills like communication styles.
  2. Search in the right places. Once you’re clear about the type of employee you’re hoping to hire, focus on discovering the best candidates in the appropriate places and drawing them to your company. Depending on who you’re looking for, this might involve placing advertisements in local print media, networking with local colleges and technical schools, or asking for recommendations from your current employees. In general, the more specific the skills you hope to find, the wider the net you’ll need to cast.
  3. Ask meaningful interview questions. Potential candidates are often counseled to conduct mock interviews. Wise employers will hone their interviewing skills, too. This means asking focused questions and listening with a purpose. A good interviewer will attempt to identify “red flags” that may indicate potential problems. For example, the candidate may provide vague or rambling answers to simple questions. This may indicate normal interview anxiety, or he or she may be hiding important facts from you — information that could directly affect your hiring decision.

Finding quality employees is not an exact science. But thoughtful preparation and careful interviewing can pay dividends for years to come.

As always, should you have any questions or concerns regarding your tax situation please feel free to contact us.

 

Factors in Finding the Best Employees

 

As always, we hope you find our tips and news for businesses valuable, and look forward to receiving your feedback. Companies focused on growth have sought the help of Insero & Co. for more than 40 years. During that time they have consistently experienced the peace of mind that comes from knowing their CPA firm takes the concept of integrity seriously. Should you have any questions, please contact us directly.

Equity vs. Debt Financing: What to Consider

Equity vs. Debt Financing: What to Consider

Whether you’re crafting an initial business plan, expanding into new markets, or focused on meeting this week’s payroll, solid funding decisions can keep your company on the right trajectory.

In addition to cash generated by operations, small businesses often get infusions of cash from two primary sources: equity and debt. Which type of financing makes the most sense for your business? Take a look at the possible pros and cons of each:

Equity Financing
Pros:
  • No interest. Unlike a loan, the company isn’t paying for the use of money.
  • No immediate repayment. You’re not required to pay investors until the business generates a profit.
  • Expertise and connections. With investors who possess experience and contacts in your industry, you can gain assistance with operational decisions, strategic planning and networking.
Cons:
  • Lost independence. If your uncle contributes hard cash, he may want a significant role in decision-making —whether or not he understands the business.
  • Longer funding cycle. Pitching your venture to friends and family or sharing the business plan on crowdfunding sites may not generate cash quickly enough to meet your needs.
  • Complicated relationships. No matter how specific your explanations, contributors may be dismayed if they fail to get expected rewards.
Debt Financing
Pros:
  • Many available sources. Your business can borrow funds from banks, suppliers, friends and from strangers through crowdfunding sites.
  • Many debt structures. You can borrow a lump sum or create a line of credit. You can vary the repayment terms and structure the interest rate as fixed or variable. If you are willing to do the math, you can determine the best structure for your needs.
  • No dilution of ownership. Unlike equity, you are not giving up your ownership to bring in funds for your business.
Cons:
  • Interest charged. You pay for the privilege of getting the money. And it is not just interest, there are often fees involved. This is especially true when using programs like SBA (Small Business Association) loans.
  • Sometimes hard to qualify. Lending officers will scrutinize your credit score and financials before agreeing to loan money, especially for a startup business. Even worse, qualifications don’t end after you receive the money. You must often meet ongoing loan covenants or the lender may call the note or require collateral.
  • Security required. Banks will want personal guarantees and security when they lend money. This can make it more difficult for you to make other business decisions.
Questions to ask when considering finance options

When determining which available financing options are the most suitable for your business, consider asking yourself these questions:

  • How much money does the company really need? Cash flow must support loan payments. Run detailed projections to determine whether you’ll really need that funding for additional equipment.
  • Can the business qualify for a loan or line of credit with reasonable terms? Some lenders may gladly offer funding, but if the interest rate is exorbitant or the terms are otherwise onerous, beware.
  • Am I willing to relinquish a measure of control? Some investors make great business partners. Others may want or expect certain levels of control. Figure out how much control you’re willing to share.

While your financing choice will ultimately depend on what’s available to your business, understanding the nuisances of both debt and equity financing will help guide you in making a more informed decision.

 

Equity vs. Debt Financing to keep your company on the right trajectory

 

As always, we hope you find our tips and news for businesses valuable, and look forward to receiving your feedback. Companies focused on growth have sought the help of Insero & Co. for more than 40 years. During that time they have consistently experienced the peace of mind that comes from knowing their CPA firm takes the concept of integrity seriously. Should you have any questions, please contact us directly.

Questions to Ask BEFORE an Economic Downturn

Questions to Ask BEFORE an Economic Downturn

America is either on the verge of a recession or intense growth. Will the stock market tank or skyrocket? Trade agreements, the Federal Reserve, election results, oil prices — these factors (and many others) will be blamed or praised depending on tomorrow’s headlines.

One thing’s for sure: even if the worst-case scenario plays out, most small businesses will adapt to survive and thrive. Others will become statistics.

Before a downturn strikes, prepare your business with a well-thought-out strategy for weathering hard times. Focus on these crucial questions when determining how your business will fare:

  • Will cash keep flowing into the business? Cash outflows won’t be a problem. You’ll always have expenses, but the company may need to shore up collection efforts, sell unused equipment, or renegotiate loan agreements in advance of a market downturn. The tougher the economic environment, the more crucial cash flow becomes. Start now by gaining a clear understanding of your monthly burn rate and cash position.
  • Will inventory be sufficient to meet demand? Consider how to reduce inventory costs without damaging your company’s reputation or customer focus. You might implement more detailed inventory tracking systems, reduce storage costs and obsolescence by using just-in-time methods, or develop a plan to offer discounts on slow-moving items. Don’t wait until a call from your suppliers forces the issue.
  • Will existing customers remain loyal? It may be far more expensive to acquire new customers than to retain clients already patronizing your business. If the economy spirals downward, your client base may be slammed. Loyal customers may face layoffs and foreclosures. Plan for that contingency. Get ready to pamper them. Offer discounts, gift cards, loyalty rewards — whatever is needed to keep them coming back.
  • Will you cut costs? Many small businesses, when faced with declining market demand, slash expenses indiscriminately. Big mistake. Although prudent cost-cutting may be warranted, your actions should fit into a well-designed plan. If management panics and lays off workers, cuts inventory and scraps marketing efforts without due consideration, unintended consequences may result. Customers may turn to competitors if they can’t get adequate service or products to meet their needs. In a downturn, plan to stay visible. Create a customer newsletter, maintain an active website, attend chamber of commerce meetings, and continue to network on social media. Redouble efforts to promote your company and its products.
  • Will the company have sufficient reserves to exploit new opportunities? Tough economic times don’t affect businesses uniformly. In fact, at such times skilled workers may be searching for employment. When competitors close their doors, new markets may materialize. When your company is growing and doing well, that’s the time to set aside cash reserves. You’ll be ready to take advantage of favorable conditions as they emerge.

No matter when an economic downturn hits, it’s crucial to think about how your business will handle hard times. Create or update your plan now to protect your company in the future.

 

Questions to Ask BEFORE an Economic Downturn

 

As always, we hope you find our tips and news for businesses valuable, and look forward to receiving your feedback. Companies focused on growth have sought the help of Insero & Co. for more than 40 years. During that time they have consistently experienced the peace of mind that comes from knowing their CPA firm takes the concept of integrity seriously. Should you have any questions, please contact us directly.

Dissolving Your Business? 6 Steps That’ll Help

Dissolving Your Business? 6 Steps That’ll Help

Closing a business is often a difficult and complicated choice to make. Usually, the decision to close has little to do with the financial performance and more to do with a change in ownership or the death or injury of a key owner. Regardless of the reason, it’s helpful to follow a systematic dissolution strategy whenever possible. Here are some steps to include as you prepare your plan:

  • Get expert advice. Dissolving a business can be a stressful and fragile process. The best place to start is by creating a buy-sell agreement long before you get to the end. By agreeing beforehand, many future problems can be avoided. If your business does not have a written agreement, get help from competent professionals (including attorneys, bankers, and others) to iron out the details.
  • Vote to dissolve the business. A sole proprietor may only need to consult with a spouse or trusted advisor. With a partnership, corporation or limited liability company, more than one business associate must agree to the dissolution. Organizational documents or a state’s business statutes often mandate the level of agreement required (a simple majority or two-thirds majority, for example), so you’ll want to consult applicable rules.
  • Fill out dissolution paperwork. Let your state and local governments know that the company is ceasing operations. The forms you need should be posted on your secretary of state’s website. Especially when a partnership or corporation is dissolved, formal filings should prevent future confusion about ownership and liabilities.
  • Cancel licenses, permits, and insurance policies. Most businesses are required to obtain city, county and/or state licenses to operate. The appropriate agencies must be notified of the dissolution. Insurance brokers should also be told to cancel business liability, health care and other company policies.
  • File a final tax return. Even if the business only operates for a portion of the year, you’ll need to notify the IRS that the company’s annual tax return is its last one.
  • Notify interested parties. You’ll need to inform lenders, suppliers, service providers and customers. Lenders will be eager to find out how you plan to repay loans. Suppliers will want to know when to make final deliveries. Utility companies will need to know when to turn out the lights and shut off the water. Customers should also be given plenty of notice about final orders and ongoing projects.

These important steps will help effectively move along your shutdown process. If you have questions about preparing your business, contact us today.

As always, should you have any questions or concerns regarding your tax situation please feel free to contact us.

 

man with laptop frustrated over dissolving a business

 

As always, we hope you find our tips and news for businesses valuable, and look forward to receiving your feedback. Companies focused on growth have sought the help of Insero & Co. for more than 40 years. During that time they have consistently experienced the peace of mind that comes from knowing their CPA firm takes the concept of integrity seriously. Should you have any questions, please contact us directly.

Fix These Common Customer Service Mistakes

Fix These Common Customer Service Mistakes

If your company provides stellar service and outstanding products, your loyal customers can grow exponentially through social media, online reviews and more traditional outlets. On the other hand, when customers complain, your company’s reputation can be damaged.

Fortunately, your team can build solid customer relationships by fixing these common customer service mistakes:

  • Mistake #1: Ignoring customers. When busy, it’s easy to develop checkout lines or call- ing queues. This frustrates all customers, both those with concerns and those that simply want to order. The net result is everyone is unhappy! Fix: For call volume, consider creating a simple auto-response recording to quickly get customers to the right area. For online ordering, make it easy for online customers to get to someone that can solve their problem. For retail, show all customers that you care. Never give the impression that they’ve intruded upon your valuable time. Make eye contact. Smile. Invite their feedback. And constantly monitor employees looking for opportunities to develop improved communication.
  • Mistake #2: Minimizing legitimate complaints. Sure, there are a lot of complaints out there that may not be resolvable, or even based on fact. But sometimes customers have mistaken notions about your products or services. Fix: Resist the temptation to ignore feedback. With every complaint, ask whether concerns might highlight an opportunity to improve. When complaints seem to arise from several sources and focus on a particular issue, pay attention. If a product doesn’t work as advertised, consider discussing the issue with suppliers.

  • Mistake #3: Defensiveness. Customers need to feel that the company is trying to address their concerns. Even if your employees feel personally attacked, they should never lash out. Fix: Train workers to remain calm. It is best to listen, repeat the complaint back to the customer, and then ask confirmation that you understand their issue. Next, ask a clarifying question. This will help deescalate any tension. Most people respond better when the situation is handled calmly and respectfully.

 

businessman holding a cell phone making customer service mistakes on a call

 

As always, we hope you find our tips and news for businesses valuable, and look forward to receiving your feedback. Companies focused on growth have sought the help of Insero & Co. for more than 40 years. During that time they have consistently experienced the peace of mind that comes from knowing their CPA firm takes the concept of integrity seriously. Should you have any questions, please contact us directly.

Monitor Inventory to Keep Cash Flowing

Monitor Inventory to Keep Cash Flowing

Skillful inventory management is often one of the biggest factors in maintaining positive cash flow. Consider these techniques for controlling your company’s inventory to improve your cash position:

 

  • Track inventory turnover. The inventory turnover ratio measures the number of times inventory is sold and replaced in a given time period (annually, quarterly or monthly). It’s calculated by dividing cost of goods sold by average inventory. Let’s say you’re a retail business that has $5 million in cost of goods sold. At the beginning of the year, your inventory balance is $600,000; at year-end, it’s $400,000. That means your average inventory is $500,000 (the sum divided by two). To get the annual inventory turnover ratio, you divide the cost of goods sold by this average. So in this example, the turnover ratio would be 10 ($5 million divided by $500,000). On average, you’re selling and replacing inventory 10 times each year. Compare historical ratios and industry averages to get a clear picture on the state of your inventory management. Low or deteriorating turnover ratios may indicate that your business is carrying excess inventories. Research to find out why.

 

  • Scrutinize aging inventory. An aged stock or inventory aging report lists items grouped by the length of time they’re being held in inventory. Like an accounts receivable aging report, an inventory aging report enables you to quantify the cost of specific slow-moving inventory items. A way to calculate this is to take the number of units on hand and then determine how many months of sales it will take to sell out of the item. If certain items aren’t selling, they may be obsolete or beyond their shelf life. You may need to write down values in the company records, provide discounted sales, or write off specific items by removing them from inventory.

 

  • Consider just-in-time (JIT) inventory management. JIT is designed to increase efficiency, reduce costs and minimize waste. Companies order goods only as needed. Depending on your business, JIT might be used to lower inventory holding costs, reduce problems with order fulfilment, and improve cash flow. Given the risk of being out of stock, JIT can work for your business if your products can be manufactured or supplied quickly, and your company’s order fulfillment system is efficient.

 

By skillfully managing inventory, your firm can continue to generate positive cash flow, satisfy customer demand, and invest in new opportunities.

 

Charts and graphs of cash flow and inventory management

 

As always, we hope you find our tips and news for businesses valuable, and look forward to receiving your feedback. Companies focused on growth have sought the help of Insero & Co. for more than 40 years. During that time they have consistently experienced the peace of mind that comes from knowing their CPA firm takes the concept of integrity seriously. Should you have any questions, please contact us directly.

Cross-training: Essential for Small Business Survival

Cross-training: Essential for Small Business Survival

Have you considered cross-training your employees to ensure more than one person knows all key functions? Cross-training can be a win-win situation for you and your employees. Large companies often use it to prepare managers for future promotions. But in small companies, it can be the difference between success and failure.

Why companies cross-train

Cross-training provides greater flexibility in scheduling, especially when dealing with unexpected workload and staffing issues. It also helps employees develop expertise in other areas and increases their awareness of the company’s roles and functions — helping them better understand where they fit into the big picture.

For employees, some of the biggest advantages include:

  • Learning new skills
  • Working more efficiently and effectively with other departments
  • Feeling more invested in the company
  • Enjoying growth opportunities

Create your cross-training plan

How you implement cross-training will depend on the size and nature of your business. Consider prioritizing the departments that need and/or want cross-training the most. These departments may be understaffed or have many new employees. Look for important functions that are currently dependent on a single person’s knowledge. These areas should be a focus of your cross-training program.

If you’re considering cross-training your team, here are a few tips to help you prepare:

  • Document your key processes. You cannot cross-train if you don’t know the process. These written processes will turn into training documents as you implement your program.
  • Communicate to your team. It’s essential to get everyone involved before you start a cross-training program. Help your team understand why the company is cross-training employees. Reasons may be to prepare for organizational growth or new industry standards, or to adjust to a changing structure around roles and responsibilities. Then continue to communicate with your team throughout the program with status updates and team meetings about progress and next steps.
  • Present cross-training as an opportunity. Your employees may be more resistant to cross-training if it feels like it’s an obligation or a threat to their roles. You can help them feel motivated by highlighting the benefits, like honing different skill sets and having a better understanding of how their contributions positively impact the business.
  • Start with a small pilot program. Test the waters with a select group of employees to get a better understanding of what works and what needs to be tweaked. You can then expand the program later as you gain insight and experience.
  • Determine cross-training hours. Figure out how much time can be dedicated to cross-training for each team to still run efficiently. This may include carving out a few hours each day, or setting aside full days for a certain period of time to focus on cross-training. If your business is seasonal, ramp up cross-training during your low seasonal period.
  • Listen to feedback. You may learn that some employees have already started practicing cross-training on their own. You can use this kind of valuable feedback to fine tune the program.

Keep in mind that some employees may resist having to train others, and productivity may suffer in the short term. But remember the cost of not cross-training. If you lose a key employee and no one else knows how to do their tasks, your business may be in trouble.

 

Cross-training: Essential for Small Business Survival

 

As always, we hope you find our tips and news for businesses valuable, and look forward to receiving your feedback. Companies focused on growth have sought the help of Insero & Co. for more than 40 years. During that time they have consistently experienced the peace of mind that comes from knowing their CPA firm takes the concept of integrity seriously. Should you have any questions, please contact us directly.