What to Consider When You Lease Commercial Property

What to Consider When You Lease Commercial Property

Decisions about location and leasing commercial space can be significant factors in determining a business’s long-term profitability. That’s because the cost of leasing space is often one of the biggest numbers on the profit-and-loss statement. Consider the following as you look for a space that fits your bottom line:

  • Give yourself time.
    At least six months before you plan to move in, begin the selection process. Scout out locations and narrow your choices. Waiting until you’re desperate for space may leave you with fewer options. Starting early may also provide opportunities to observe walk-by or drive-by traffic, the location’s visibility, and the habits of neighboring tenants. It may also provide more time to develop a better understanding of the level of lease payments your business can afford to pay.
  • Compare properties.
    In addition to identifying a property that’s located near your client base, comparison shopping can give you a better understanding of the value of the property you’re considering, as well as provide negotiating leverage. Develop a matrix of the must-have elements of your location. Then place each location you are considering into the matrix. It will give you a nice comparative visual to help make the right decision.
  • Negotiate terms!
    Use your location comparison matrix to begin negotiations with the landlord. Ideas include getting free rent while you build out your space, a longer-term lease with no or low escalation of rent, and getting the landlord to cover more of the maintenance costs.
  • Read the lease — then read it again.
    Once you’ve found your space and have the framework for a deal, you will receive your lease. Review the lease. Pay special attention to the length (term) of the lease, renewal options and scheduled rent increases. Scrutinize clauses describing your responsibility for utilities, maintenance and upkeep of common areas and systems. Make sure the lease agreement matches your understanding of the negotiated terms. The agreement must spell out your options for subleasing and delineate default provisions. Termination options, security deposits, allowances for leasehold improvements — all should be specified in the contract.
  • Work with professionals.
    It makes sense to hire a real estate attorney and other professionals to help find the right space and review the lease terms before signing. An experienced broker may also provide assistance when negotiating lease terms. Careful evaluation and bargaining at the front end may save dollars and avert headaches later on.

If you have questions about how leasing a commercial space will affect your business tax plan, contact us today.

commercial property for lease

 

As always, we hope you find our tips and news for businesses valuable, and look forward to receiving your feedback. Companies focused on growth have sought the help of Insero & Co. for more than 40 years. During that time they have consistently experienced the peace of mind that comes from knowing their CPA firm takes the concept of integrity seriously. Should you have any questions, please contact us directly.

Is Crowdfunding for You?

Is Crowdfunding for You?

Let’s say you attend a small business convention to seek out potential investors to develop a new product. With each new contact, you share details about your latest business idea. You try to generate excitement about your idea, one person at a time.

Now consider having the same conversation with thousands of investors all over the world. That’s the essence of crowdfunding. If you’re interested in crowdfunding for your business, however, there are a few things you should know.

How it works

As the name implies, crowdfunding is the practice of pooling small investments from a large group of people to fund an activity. It can replace a bank, friends or private investment companies to start a company, fund the development of a new product or create a new service.

There are many online crowdfunding platforms, including Kickstarter, Indiegogo, Republic, CircleUp, Crowdfunder and GoFundMe. Each site requires that you set up a profile, establish a funding goal and publish your financing request. People can then donate to your cause or purchase shares in your business.

Of course, investors and contributors expect some form of reward for helping out companies through crowdfunding. For those donating to a non-profit organization, the reward might be as simple as a handwritten thank-you note or a tax deduction (if applicable). Others might gain early access to a discounted product. Some might invest with the expectation that share values will increase over time (known as equity-based crowdfunding). Others might purchase debt-based shares with a fixed interest rate (crowdlending).

What to consider before crowdfunding

Whether you’re considering an investment or trying to raise funds for a new product, ask yourself the following questions:

  • Are you comfortable broadcasting your plans? Be aware that competitors will have access to your idea and business profile. One of the initial developers of a digital watch, Pebble, used crowdfunding to fund their product only to see their business idea overtaken by others including Apple.
  • Are you prepared to create an appealing campaign? Review the crowdfunding site and see what appears to be working. You will need to be prepared to create an appealing campaign that will stand out on the crowdfunder’s site.
  • Will this platform reach my target investors or users? Different crowdfunding platforms focus on specific funding pools. Find out what would be the best for your business.
  • What’s the fee structure? Understand the models and the costs associated with the platform’s fundraising practices.
  • How much money do you plan on raising? Most crowdfunding requests are small. That makes the individual risk for any one donation or investment small as well.
  • How much time will be allotted to reach my funding goal? Companies levy fees to process investments or pledges, and you may be hit with increased charges if targets aren’t met.
  • What about shipping? Don’t forget to specify shipping terms in your campaign narrative and budget for those costs, when needed.

Crowdfunding is worth consideration as an alternative to traditional financing. But before you sign up, be sure to study the details.

 

considering an investment or trying to raise funds for a new product

As always, should you have any questions or concerns regarding your tax situation please feel free to contact us.

As always, we hope you find our tips and news for businesses valuable, and look forward to receiving your feedback. Companies focused on growth have sought the help of Insero & Co. for more than 40 years. During that time they have consistently experienced the peace of mind that comes from knowing their CPA firm takes the concept of integrity seriously. Should you have any questions, please contact us directly.

Employee or Independent Contractor: Know the Difference!

Are some of your workers independent contractors instead of employees? Correctly classifying your workers will preserve the tax breaks that come with hiring independent contractors — and help you avoid major penalties.

Why it matters

Employers are required to withhold taxes for employees and pay the employer’s share of payroll taxes on wages. These amounts are reported to the IRS, as well as state tax obligations. An employer may also be liable for fringe benefits for eligible employees, like health insurance and matching 401(k) contributions.

Conversely, an employer doesn’t have to withhold or pay taxes on behalf of independent contractors. These workers take care of taxes, insurance and other benefits on their own.This is why the IRS pays special attention to how workers are classified.

Control is key. Generally, the issue boils down to control. If an employer maintains behavioral and financial control over a worker, he or she should be treated as an employee. Independent contractors, on the other hand, have a high level of autonomy and independence over the work being performed.

Avoid misclassification

The stakes are high. If the IRS discovers a misclassification, it will assess back taxes for the tax years in question, plus interest and penalties. For an intentional error, criminal sanctions may be imposed.

Here’s what an employer can do to avoid the IRS challenging an independent contractor classification:

  • Understand the tax rules. If you exercise a great deal of control over workers, they are likely to be considered employees.
  • Be specific. Spell out the services to be performed by independent contractors, their responsibilities and the expectations in a written contract.
  • Keep work schedules flexible. Avoid setting a regular work schedule for independent contractors. Allow them the ability to set their own hours.
  • Maintain separate payment practices. Compensate independent contractors on a per-job basis. Don’t pay them a regular amount each payroll period, like you do employees.
  • Review work arrangements periodically. Request invoices from independent contractors before payments are made.
  • Be careful about benefits. You don’t need to cover independent contractors under a health insurance plan or provide other fringe benefits that are typically given to employees.

Keep in mind that an employer that has experienced misclassification issues may qualify for tax penalty relief if it can establish it has a reasonable basis for treating workers as independent contractors. This is based on various factors and past history. Back taxes and penalties may be waived if the employer has been consistent in its treatment.

Call us if you have questions about your business situation.

definition of employee vs. indpenedent contractor in the dictionary

As always, we hope you find our tips and news for businesses valuable, and look forward to receiving your feedback. Companies focused on growth have sought the help of Insero & Co. for more than 40 years. During that time they have consistently experienced the peace of mind that comes from knowing their CPA firm takes the concept of integrity seriously. Should you have any questions, please contact us directly.

Ideas to Help Control Health Insurance Costs

Ideas to Help Control Health Insurance Costs

As health care costs continue to rise, businesses are facing some tough decisions to stay profitable while maintaining this important employee benefit. With insurance renewal season right around the corner, now is the time to evaluate your plan. Consider these cost-cutting ideas:

  1. Review your current plan and shop around. The first step to shoring up your health care benefits is to review your current insurance plan. What do you like about it? Where do you have issues? Engaging your employees and asking for their opinions can provide you some insight, as well. Having a full understanding of your plan allows you to effectively compare the costs of other insurance providers. In many cases you can save costs and add benefits simply by changing insurance companies or coverage options.
  2. Move to a high-deductible health insurance plan. The upfront savings realized by high-deductible health plans (HDHP) make them an enticing option for employers and employees alike. The monthly premiums for HDHPs are lower compared to traditional plans, but the employee has to pay more out of pocket for their health expenses because of the higher deductible. To offset the extra cost to employees, you can offer a health savings account (HSA) to pair with the HDHP. With this approach employees can pay for medical expenses with pre-tax dollars. You, as the employer, can help offset the cost of the higher deductible by making tax-free contributions to your employees’ HSAs.
  3. Consider self-funded options. If properly executed, self-funded insurance plans can save your business money and improve cash flow. The basic concept is that you (the employer) pay the medical claims directly, instead of paying premiums to an insurance provider. Switching to a self-funded plan involves hiring a third party administrator to process the claims, creating a reserve fund to pay the claims, and purchasing stop-loss insurance to protect your company from catastrophic events. All in, a self-funded plan can cut your health benefit costs by up to 10 percent, according to Hub International.
  4. Encourage alternatives to traditional doctor visits. When setting premiums, health insurance companies factor in the cost of covering the claims made by your employees. One way to help control these costs is to educate your employees on the alternatives to traditional clinics and emergency room visits. For example, there are now alternatives such as nursing lines, online doctor consultations and remote monitoring apps that can cut your costs and save your employees some money. With a lower claim history, your future insurance premiums may not be as impacted by skyrocketing health insurance costs.
  5. Promote employee wellness initiatives. Another way to lower medical expenses is to promote the health of your employees. Wellness programs can be as simple as offering flu shots, onsite cancer screenings or organizing a company 5k run. The options are endless, but choosing the correct approach is key to your program’s success. According to a study by Knowable Magazine, an effective program starts at the top. Before rolling out a wellness initiative, present your plan to your company’s leadership team to get them on board.

The proper approach to cutting health care costs is different for every company, so take the time to research your options to ensure the correct fit for your business.

Control Health Insurance Costs

As always, we hope you find our tips and news for businesses valuable, and look forward to receiving your feedback. Companies focused on growth have sought the help of Insero & Co. for more than 40 years. During that time they have consistently experienced the peace of mind that comes from knowing their CPA firm takes the concept of integrity seriously. Should you have any questions, please contact us directly.

Bad Debts Cause More Trouble than You Think

How to effectively use your bad debt allowance

When your business extends credit to customers who don’t settle accounts, their debt becomes bad debt. For businesses using the accrual basis method of accounting, establishing the correct bad debt allowance (also called an allowance for doubtful accounts) can bring the asset section of the balance sheet into focus.

 

The basics

The bad debt allowance (balance sheet) and related bad debt expense (income statement) accounts were established to help level out the impact of an uncollected invoice on any one particular financial month. By booking a reasonable estimate of bad debt expense each month, the roller coaster ride of writing off an account in any one month no longer materially impacts a business’ income statement. Instead, you build up a bad debt reserve on your company’s balance sheet to account for the actual recognition of writing off uncollectible sales on the balance sheet.

 

Here’s an example: Assume your accounts receivable totals $500,000. After careful consideration, you determine that only $440,000 is likely collectible this year. By creating a monthly bad debt expense of $5,000 on your income statement, the bad debt allowance on your balance sheet will build up to $60,000 over a year. Then when a write off is required, the reduction is in the allowance account NOT on your income statement. By doing this, you’ll gain a more accurate picture of the company’s monthly financial health, unaffected by one or two large bad debts.

 

Many businesses use a percentage of prior credit sales to calculate bad debt allowance. If your company’s credit sales totaled $100,000 last quarter and bad debts over the same period amount to 2 percent of sales revenue, you could establish an allowance of $2,000. As an alternative, you might assign risk factors based on individual clients, especially if the firm relies on a few large customers.

 

man writing debt

Managing your bad debt allowance

Regardless of the method chosen to calculate bad debt allowance, monitoring it should be a priority. Use these guidelines to help you manage your allowance:

  • Understand the tax implications. Only debts that are considered completely worthless and uncollectible can be taken as an expense on your business tax return — the allowance approach described here is not allowed. Some additional analysis and adjustments to the bad debt on your books will be required when it comes to filing your tax return.
  • Diligently track your allowance. Watch for rising and falling allowance levels, as they will help determine your course of action.
    • Allowance is climbing. A bad debt reserve that’s routinely increasing might highlight the need to adjust policies for extending credit or collecting payment. It means your estimate for bad debts is much higher than actual uncollectible debts. Perhaps you are not being aggressive enough in identifying actual bad debts. Lack of attention here could negatively impact your net asset condition and cause unneeded attention from your bank.
    • Allowance is falling. A declining allowance may indicate you are writing off more uncollectible accounts than you estimated. You need to understand the underlying cause. Perhaps a major customer went out of business or your account receivable group is not pursuing collection aggressively enough.
    • Allowance is holding steady. The initial indication here is that your estimate of bad debts might be appropriate. However, you should still conduct periodic reviews of your accounts receivable aging report to ensure your expectations of credit management are being met. Adjustments should be made as the collectability of specific receivables becomes clearer.

Understanding the bad debt allowance and how it works in conjunction with bad debt expense can really help you manage your financial condition and quickly see if your accounts that pay on credit are being managed to your expectation. Contact us if you have questions.

 

As always, we hope you find our tips and news for businesses valuable, and look forward to receiving your feedback. Companies focused on growth have sought the help of Insero & Co. for more than 40 years. During that time they have consistently experienced the peace of mind that comes from knowing their CPA firm takes the concept of integrity seriously. Should you have any questions, please contact us directly.

Considering Employee Raises? Review These Ideas

Considering Employee Raises? Review These Ideas

Deciding how to administer employee raises can perplex even the most seasoned managers. How often should raises be given? Should they be given across the board to all workers? If staff turnover is increasing, can you turn back the tide by granting raises to the most productive workers? There’s a lot to consider.

As you create or update your plan for giving out employee raises, here are some ideas to consider:

  • Pros and cons of merit raises. You may think that giving everyone the same raise (either percentage or dollar amount) seems impartial and will produce harmony. But there’s a downside. Your top performers — workers who sell more widgets, meet customer demand more often, and maintain a great work ethic in the face of additional responsibility — often leave if they’re recognized the same as employees who show up late, have a bad attitude, or perform poorly. To solve this, consider establishing specific goals along with tiered raises for employees who meet or exceed published goals whenever possible.

 

  • Always with budget in mind. Raises mean higher labor costs, expenses that a company’s cash flow must support month after month, year after year. As you create your annual operating budget, incorporate expected labor cost increases. In addition to planning for standard cost-of-living adjustments (COLAs) and performance based wage increases, set aside funds for bonuses, commissions and “spot awards” (lump sum payouts for superior performance). You may also set guidelines for rewarding staff members whom identify operational improvements or generate goodwill in the community.

  • Reward existing staff first. When companies grow, they often face the prospect of hiring additional staff. If you’re in that enviable position, remember to review your current employees. A business that’s gaining customers and market share may load additional responsibility on existing workers. Plus, your more experienced employees may be asked to train new staff or work longer shifts. This current compensation review is especially important if the job market requires hiring new employees at or above the rates of your current, seasoned staff.

 

  • Communicate expectations regularly. Clearly state and routinely emphasize performance goals. Consider separating personal performance discussions with salary action. That way if revenues are down and you’re faced with the tough choice of freezing salaries, there is less chance an individual’s performance will be solely linked to pay. Then you can creatively use incentives and spot awards to reward behavior and ideas that help your business turn the corner.

 

A highly structured system for granting raises may allow your company to stay within budget, but if your best workers become dissatisfied and leave, labor costs can skyrocket. A well-managed payroll system that rewards great performers on a regular basis and is understood by all employees can be an effective tool to retain workers and help keep morale high.

 

As always, we hope you find our tips and news for businesses valuable, and look forward to receiving your feedback. Companies focused on growth have sought the help of Insero & Co. for more than 40 years. During that time they have consistently experienced the peace of mind that comes from knowing their CPA firm takes the concept of integrity seriously. Should you have any questions, please contact us directly.

7 Common Small Business Accounting Mistakes

7 Common Small Business Accounting Mistakes

Keeping your company books in order can be tough. It’s hard to find the time to give it the proper attention. When you finally do, understanding the complicated, ever-changing accounting rules can be a challenge. Consider these common accounting mistakes to ensure they do not happen to your business:

  1. Mixing in personal expenses. Having non-business costs included in your financials will harm your business in three ways. First, your financial statements will not accurately portray your business performance. Second, personal expenses are a drag on your available cash. Third, the IRS is quick to deny legitimate business expenses as tax deductions if it perceives that personal expenses are comingled. Common sources of non-business expenses to watch for are credit card charges and expense reimbursements.
  2. Not keeping your books current. Think bookkeeping is frustrating? Try waiting a month or two to enter your transactions. Falling behind has a compounding effect on the time needed to get back on track. Complex entries get even more complicated as your ability to quickly recall transaction details diminishes over time. All the while, your business continues to run and set you back even more. Set a goal to have all transactions entered by the end of every week.
  3. Entering capital assets as expenses. Because capital assets provide long-term value, they are entered on the balance sheet and depreciated over multiple years. Mis­classifying a capital asset as an expense will torpedo your net income for that period. To avoid this, review large purchases and comb expense accounts likely to be hiding capital assets during your month-end review. Remember, while you depreciate these capital assets over many years on your books, special tax treatment allows certain capital assets to be fully deducted on your taxes.
  4. Not performing monthly bank reconciliations. When you receive your monthly bank statements, ensure they are reconciled to your books within a week or two. Bank reconciliations almost always identify errors. Delaying bank reconciliations will add unneeded complexity and decrease your chances of correcting an error.
  5. Mishandling of sales tax. Many businesses book sales tax they receive as revenue. This is not the proper treatment. Sales tax you receive should be entered as a liability until you remit it to the proper tax authority, ultimately avoiding your income statement altogether. Conversely, sales tax you pay on purchases should be booked as an expense.
  6. Lacking proper documentation. Most business owners know that you need to save invoices and receipts for sales and purchases, but what about documentation for adjustments and journal entries? Proving these are just as important. Contracts, time sheets and shipping documents are some examples of substantiation required to support your entries.
  7. Devoting too much of your time. Most entrepreneurs start their business for reasons other than spending hours working on the books. Don’t get bogged down worrying about the inner-workings of accounting rules and tax laws. Partnering with an expert to handle your bookkeeping needs can free you up to use your expertise where it’s needed the most — running and growing your business.

Contact us today to discuss your business bookkeeping needs or to schedule an appointment.

calculator to keep company books in order

As always, we hope you find our tips and news for businesses valuable, and look forward to receiving your feedback. Companies focused on growth have sought the help of Insero & Co. for more than 40 years. During that time they have consistently experienced the peace of mind that comes from knowing their CPA firm takes the concept of integrity seriously. Should you have any questions, please contact us directly.

Line of credit: what you should know

Line of credit: what you should know

A bank line of credit is similar in function to a credit card. It provides a reliable source of cash for potential short-term business needs. If you’re considering a bank line of credit, here’s what you should know:

How it works

With a line of credit, you make draws against your credit line from time to time as you need cash. You pay interest only on the amount of the outstanding loan balance. You are expected to make payments and occasionally bring your outstanding balance to zero.

Example: Assume you have a $100,000 line of credit. You are not obligated to draw any of it at any given time, and you will pay no interest until you actually make a draw (much like a credit card).

Now assume that you must build up your inventory for the holiday shopping season and need $30,000 to do so. After your inventory purchase, you still have $70,000 of your credit line available; you are only paying interest on the $30,000 you used. You may have several occasions during the year to borrow on your line of credit. Since your line of credit is intended for short-term cash needs, your banker expects your balance to be paid down as your cash flow improves.

business chart for line of credit

Use your credit wisely

Do not use a line of credit for capital purchases. If you need to expand your building or buy new equipment, arrange a term loan for that specific acquisition. This allows your creditor to use the new equipment to secure the loan and it keeps your line of credit free for short-term needs.

While a line of credit may have a low interest rate, most don’t have a fixed rate. The rate can change depending on the market at the time that you borrow, plus how much you borrow. You may end up paying a much higher interest rate if you already used your line of credit and need to borrow more money to cover another shortage.

Qualifying for a line of credit

If your business has at least two years of making a profit, you may qualify for a line of credit. Start by checking with your current bank. Your banker would like to keep your business, and if your financial statements support it, you will most likely be offered the line of credit. Depending on the size of the line of credit, be prepared to put up your business and personal assets as collateral. The bank may even request a co-signer on the note.

Most banks are willing to make loans to businesses that have uneven income cycles, but you may want to shop around for the best loan terms. Some banks may already have several customers in your industry and do not want more (a potential bank examiner’s concern). Accordingly, their terms may be less favorable than some other bank or credit union.

Contact us today if you would like assistance in preparing a request for a line of credit.

As always, we hope you find our tips and news for businesses valuable, and look forward to receiving your feedback. Companies focused on growth have sought the help of Insero & Co. for more than 40 years. During that time they have consistently experienced the peace of mind that comes from knowing their CPA firm takes the concept of integrity seriously. Should you have any questions, please contact us directly.

 

Make Meetings Worth Everyone’s Time

Make meetings worth everyone’s time

For most companies, business meetings are a fact of life. Although meetings are generally meant to be useful and necessary, too many of them simply waste time. Some may even harm morale. Luckily, you can change that.

 

Here are a few ideas for making business meetings truly worth the time:
  • Use other forms of communication whenever possible. Most meetings are held to disseminate information. The participants are informed or reminded about policies, given progress reports about ongoing activities, or told of upcoming events. However, unless you’re soliciting input or anticipating confusion about the subject matter, consider substituting emails or other memoranda to communicate routine information. That way, you’ll be providing written guidelines while saving everyone’s time.
  • Skip unneeded meetings. Don’t hold a meeting solely because it’s part of the usual schedule (e.g., the weekly staff meeting). Once again, if the topic of the week can be conveyed in a memo, or there’s nothing important to discuss, simply cancel. If you do hold a meeting but exhaust your topic early, adjourn rather than trying to fill the allotted time.
  • Prepare your meeting participants. If your meeting objective is to generate ideas or consensus, you can kickstart the creative process by distributing an agenda with guidelines a few days beforehand. Letting the participants mull over the topics in advance can maximize productivity and minimize orientation time. Encourage a diversity of opinions and positions, but be prepared to tactfully deflect digression or showboating.
  • Summarize the meeting results. At the end of any meeting, briefly sum up the proceedings, clarify actions to be taken, and identify who is responsible for assigned tasks. An important goal is to make your participants feel they are a vital part of company processes.

Once you begin integrating these ideas into your business’s meeting culture, you’ll likely find that meetings will become more efficient and effective — and employees will be thankful.

two women meeting, communicating with business work

As always, we hope you find our tips and news for businesses valuable, and look forward to receiving your feedback. Companies focused on growth have sought the help of Insero & Co. for more than 40 years. During that time they have consistently experienced the peace of mind that comes from knowing their CPA firm takes the concept of integrity seriously. Should you have any questions, please contact us directly.

4 Ways to Control Seasonality Problems

4 ways to control seasonality problems

The No. 1 cause of business failure is poor cash flow management. Cash Flow Corner gives you tips to help you master this business fundamental.

Large swings in revenue throughout the year brought on by holiday shopping, weather and other annual events can make it exceptionally difficult for seasonal businesses to plan and sustain a positive cash flow.

business data in charts to effectively manage seasonality cash flow changes

The following tips can help seasonal businesses cope with downturns and effectively manage cash flow throughout the year:

  • When times are good, get a line of credit. The best time to set up a line of credit is when you don’t need it. Not only will you have the extra time it may take to secure a loan from a bank, you’ll also gain peace of mind knowing that it’ll be there when you need it.
  • Leverage your supplier relationships. The goodwill you build up with your suppliers will likely make them more inclined to help you out with alternative terms that keep cash in your pocket during low sales periods. For instance, your suppliers may agree to hold a portion of your inventory and accept payments upon release, instead of requiring upfront payment for the entire lot. Long-term suppliers will help as they know your business and that you will not be ordering from a competitor. You benefit by aligning your supplier payments closer to when you will be selling the product.
  • Create a labor strategy that optimizes your cash flow. Consider giving your employees time off during low seasons and incentivizing them by offering higher pay during peak seasons. You may also minimize your need to hire extra staff or pay overtime during peak season if you’re able to shift some of that work into the downtime months when your employees are light on tasks.
  • Partner with your customers. Your customers can help you maintain a steady cash flow throughout the year if you give them the right opportunities to do so. Incentivize them to make purchases during your low season by offering worthwhile discounts that expire before the peak season.

Contact us for a review of your company’s cash flow management plan.

As always, we hope you find our tips and news for businesses valuable, and look forward to receiving your feedback. Companies focused on growth have sought the help of Insero & Co. for more than 40 years. During that time they have consistently experienced the peace of mind that comes from knowing their CPA firm takes the concept of integrity seriously. Should you have any questions, please contact us directly.