Tax Update: March 2016

At Insero, we make it our business to stay abreast of the latest trends and technical updates in accounting, tax, and audit and we understand how important timely updates are to our clients. As a member of the McGladrey Alliance, we also have the benefit of access to the resources and subject matter experts of RSM US LLP (formerly known as McGladrey LLP). This includes regular updates on the latest federal, state, and international tax news. We hope that you find these informative and useful, and invite you to reach out to us if you have any questions.

Federal

  • New Form 1095-C due to employees by March 31, 2016
  • IRS denies S corporation an ordinary loss on worthless stock
  • Partnership varying interest regulations now effective
  • Tax-related ID theft and tax data security issues continue to plague IRS
  • Flip or flop-a cautionary tale
  • Gain determined separately, not netted, for separately acquired blocks of stock
  • Leasing your office or building? Be mindful of this tax pitfall

International Tax

  • European Union anti-tax avoidance
  • Foreign pensions require withholding certificate to claim FIRPTA exemption

State and Local Tax

  • Delaware to shift to single sales factor apportionment
  • States beginning to respond to federal partnership changes

Source: RSM US LLP
Used with permission as a member of the McGladrey Alliance
http://rsmus.com/our-insights/newsletters/tax-digest.html

Disclaimer

As always, we hope you enjoy this edition of our newsletter and we look forward to receiving your feedback. Should you have any questions regarding the information contained in the attached materials or our service offerings, please contact us directly.

Tax Alert: IRS Makes it Easier for Small Businesses to Apply the Tangible Property Regulations to 2014 and Future Years

The IRS issued Revenue Procedure 2015-20 which makes it easier for small business owners to comply with the final tangible property regulations. The simplified procedures were requested by many small businesses and tax professionals. The simplified procedure is available beginning with the filing of the 2014 tax returns and allows small businesses to change a method of accounting under the final tangible property regulations on a prospective basis for the first taxable year beginning on or after Jan. 1, 2014. Furthermore, the IRS is waiving the requirement to complete and file a Form 3115 for small business taxpayers that choose to use this simplified procedure for 2014.

The new simplified procedure is generally available to small businesses, including sole proprietors, with assets totaling less than $10 million or average annual gross receipts totaling $10 million or less. The revenue procedure also requests comments on whether the $500 safe-harbor threshold should be raised for businesses that choose to deduct, rather than capitalize, certain capital expenses.

Although the new simplified procedures will be a welcomed relief for some small businesses, other taxpayers will find it beneficial to apply the final regulations and file Form(s) 3115 in order to dispose of or expense prior assets and potentially receive audit protection. Furthermore, correction of prior depreciation errors still require the filing of Form 3115.

If you would like more details about these changes or if you have additional questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Tax Alert: Tax Increase Prevention Act of 2014

On Dec. 16, 2014, Congress passed the “Tax Increase Prevention Act of 2014,” (TIPA, or “the Act”), which the President has signed into law. In the recently enacted “Tax Increase Prevention Act of 2014,” Congress has once again extended a package of expired or expiring individual, business, and energy provisions known as “extenders.” The extenders are a varied assortment of more than 50 individual and business tax deductions, tax credits, and other tax-saving laws which have been on the books for years but which technically are temporary because they have a specific end date. Congress has repeatedly extended the tax breaks for short periods of time (e.g., one or two years), which is why they are referred to as “extenders.” The new legislation generally extends the tax breaks retroactively, most of which expired at the end of 2013, for one year through 2014.

Capitol Hill

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Use IRS Adjusted Numbers for 2014 Tax Planning

Certain tax numbers are adjusted by the IRS for inflation each year. Here are some of the 2014 tax numbers you’ll need to use as you get started with this year’s tax planning.

Plan Ahead

  • The standard mileage rate for business driving decreases to 56¢ per mile for 2014. The rate for medical and moving mileage decreases from 24¢ per mile to 23.5¢ per mile. The general rate for charitable driving remains at 14¢ per mile.
  • The maximum earnings subject to social security tax in 2014 increases to $117,000. The earnings limit for those under full retirement age is $15,480. For those at full retirement age, there is no earnings limit.
  • The “nanny tax” threshold increases to $1,900 for 2014. If you pay household workers more than this amount during the year, you’re responsible for payroll taxes.
  • The “kiddie tax” threshold for 2014 remains unchanged at $2,000. If your child under age 19 (under age 24 for students) has more than $2,000 of unearned income this year (e.g., dividends and interest income), the excess could be taxed at your highest rate.
  • The maximum individual retirement account (IRA) contribution you can make in 2014 remains at $5,500 if you’re under age 50 and at $6,500 if you are 50 or older.
  • The maximum amount of wages employees can put into a 401(k) plan remains unchanged at $17,500. The 2014 maximum allowed for SIMPLE plans remains at $12,000. If you are 50 or older, you can contribute up to $23,000 to a 401(k) and $14,500 to a SIMPLE plan.
  • For 2014, the maximum amount that can be contributed to a health savings account (HSA) increases to $3,300 for individuals and $6,550 for families. Those 55 and older can contribute an additional $1,000.
  • The alternative minimum tax exemption for 2014 is $52,800 for singles and $82,100 for couples filing joint returns.